Indiana University Bloomington

History journal examines Huguenot refugees, idea of Latin America, global concepts of time

  • Dec. 20, 2013

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Articles on Huguenot refugees from Europe, the "invention" of Latin America in the 19th century, global configurations of time, and art education in 20th-century South Africa are featured in the December 2013 issue of the American Historical Review.

The issue also includes the annual AHR Conversation, in which editor Robert A. Schneider, professor of history at IU Bloomington, discusses the topic "How Size Matters: The Question of Scale in History" with Sebouh David Aslanian of UCLA, Joyce E. Chaplin of Harvard, Kristin Mann of Emory University and Ann McGrath of the Australian National University.

Also in the issue are five featured reviews and the journal's usual extensive book review section. The American Historical Review is the official publication of the American Historical Association. Its editorial offices are at Indiana University Bloomington.

Articles in the December 2013 issue include:

  • "Between Eden and Empire: Huguenot Refugees and the Promise of New Worlds." During the last two decades of the 17th century, thousands of French Protestants left Europe to settle on the peripheries of the English and Dutch empires. Owen Stanwood examines this “global Refuge,” focusing on the conflict between the attempts by the refugees to establish Edenic new worlds and their imperial and economic manipulation by Dutch and English authorities.
  • "The Invention of Latin America: A Transnational History of Anti-Imperialism, Democracy, and Race." Michel Gobat rethinks the origins and significance of the idea of "Latin America." Although the concept was associated with an ideology of whiteness imported from Europe, he argues that it was also imbued with a democratic ethos constructed against U.S. and European expansionism.
  • "Whose Time Is It? The Pluralization of Time and the Global Condition, 1870s–1940s." Focusing on the diverse commercial and intellectual centers of Bombay and Beirut in the increasingly globalized world of the 19th century, Vanessa Ogle explores the ways in which European concepts of uniform, standardized time competed with other varieties.
  • "Two Stories about Art, Education, and Beauty in Twentieth-Century South Africa." Daniel Magaziner examines the training of black art teachers in South Africa. Writing about the Ndaleni School between 1951 and 1981, he suggests that intellectual life under apartheid both constrained and encouraged creativity and the pursuit of beauty.

Additional information, including more complete summaries and JSTOR links to full-text articles, is available on the journal's website. The American Historical Review is published five times a year by Oxford University Press.

Related Links

The cover image of this month's American Historical Review, Jean-Léon Gérôme's painting "Bonaparte before the Sphinx," evokes the contrasting scales of history that are the focus of the issue's AHR Conversation.

The cover image of this month's American Historical Review, Jean-Léon Gérôme's painting "Bonaparte before the Sphinx," evokes the contrasting scales of history that are the focus of the issue's AHR Conversation.

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